Some Federations Reviews

Speaking of Federations! The antho has been getting some pretty good reviews. Most don’t mention my story, probably because it’s very short or it just didn’t ping the reviewers particularly (this is not a surprise given how strong this antho is), but a couple have.

On Tor.com Arachne Jericho said:

There are also smaller but no less important niches to be filled in such a treatment—like humorous moments (would you believe that Harry Turtledove wrote a humorous story about space-faring hamsters?), psychological horror (Robert Silverberg, I will never ever believe in your sweet innocence ever EVER again), and a variety of contemplative and thoughtful pauses (the offbeat waiting-for-Godot style “Carthago Delenda Est” by Genevieve Valentine, the beautiful settings and character interaction of Yoon Ha Lee’s “Swanwatch,” and the most frank treatment of the “alien civilizations are likely not homogenous” I’ve seen or read, K. Tempest Bradford’s “Different Day”).

And BSCreview said:

One of the shortest stories of the anthology and as the editor puts it in the foreword, something of an anti-science fiction story. In just over two pages, Bradford takes a shot at a number of common but fairly illogical themes in science fiction (movies and television in particular). Why do aliens always end up in the US for instance? Why are they so often seen as not only technologically but also morally superior? In itself it’s probably not a brilliant story, or perhaps that is just me, I always have problems appreciating a story this short, but the way Adams slips it in here forces the reader to consider another perspective on the anthology as a whole.

More as I happen upon them.

Comments

  1. says

    OMG, I am just going to take this opportunity to opine about brevity-haters. Wth is wrong with conciseness? The story made its point and didn’t waste my time. HOW IS THAT NOT AWESOME.

  2. Leah says

    The friend in me is highly irritated that they give you such backhanded compliments. Very annoying. Like they think they aren’t supposed to like your work, but they can’t help that they do, so they must grudgingly praise it.