Life is Compliated, I’ll Talk About Tarot, Instead

Life is Compliated, I'll Talk About Tarot, Instead

There are about 7 million things I need to attend to, but due to various life stuff, I haven’t been able to.  And, of course, I’ve been quiet on the blog for two days.  Horrors!

So, let’s talk about something fun: Tarot.

I’ve been reading various things about tarot for months because I’m writing a kids book for CatsCurious Press based on tarot.  Yes, I know, this is the first time you’re hearing about this. I kept waiting and waiting to make the announcement and now I am just like: yes, book deal, moving on.  Sometimes I can be strange.

ANYWAY, tarot books. After coming across more than my fair share of really silly books about tarot I pinged my homie Barth Anderson, because he wrote a novel about tarot.  Tarot and a bunch of other crazy mythological shit, and you know how I love the mythological shit. The Magician and The Fool is a pretty awesome book and I’m going to talk about it in a sec.

Back to Barth.  I asked him if he could point me toward some non-stupid books.  We chatted a bit about tarot and crazy new-age books and sucklike.  He pointed me toward one book, and in looking for that book at the store I came across this one: The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination. This book is interesting, particularly the history bits. I’m going to use a few of the ideas in constructing my story, yay. Reading that book made me want to read The Magician and The Fool again, because I was trying to remember how much of the history stuff Barth mentioned there.  So, I did.

When I first read this book, I was totally hooked.  For people like me who are totally into mythology and ancient mysteries, this was some serious crackfic.  I liked it just as much the second time around, but had the same feeling that all the threads were not resolved to my satisfaction. Possibly because I want answers to ancient mysteries and care less about the character arcs being resolved. This is completely opposite from my normal reactions to fiction — this must be how hard SF readers feel about Spin.

After I finished The Magician and The Fool, I had a serious itch to pick up one of my many tarot decks. I went through a period where I scooped up a bunch of decks based on a variety of reasons. I only have two decks I ever regularly used, though: the Goddess deck and the William Blake deck, which is annoyingly obscure. I had to buy it from the dude who created it because it wasn’t available on Amazon at the time. I only use the Blake deck for artistic/creative work. I lost the book to the Goddess deck a while ago and felt kind of lost without it. But the desire to throw down was really strong, so I pulled the deck out and decided to see what happened if I just tried to interpret the cards themselves.

And now it’s as if I’ve always known what the cards mean even though I didn’t before. My brain is all inside-out!

I’ve done a few readings in the past couple of days and just as spot on as I used to be. (Yes, I used to be kind of good at reading.) This is very weird to me, and I can’t even explain why it is so weird. I’m not sure what’s going to happen when I crack the Blake deck again, because that one is even more mind-bending than “regular” tarots.

Okay, back to 7 million things.

Comments

  1. Rose Fox says

    Someplace (I really must organize my nonfiction) I have a book that discusses each card’s interpretations in different decks. It’s a really nifty reference. If I dig it up I’ll send you the title.

  2. Aunty Wend says

    Wait, you *have a book deal*???? Congratulations!

    When are you coming to England to read my tarot and give me your sweet potato pancake recipe?

  3. says

    Remain faithful to ye olde Ryder deck.

    The deck I will not touch is the travesty called the orisha deck. One of the foundations of the Lucumi religion is an elegantly intricate divination system that belongs to itself, Ifá, th mano de Orula. There are also at least two other related divination systems within the orisha world as well.

    Love, C.